Bath police gravy train

August 23, 2010 10:53 AM

The overtime gravy train for the police continues to chug along in Avon and Somerset. Last year, Avon and Somerset police went over budget by £2 million. Four of their PCs managed to earn more than theirBath TPA-small inspectors. A fully trained Police Constable is paid a starting salary of £25,317 but by claiming overtime, four PCs earned over £50,000 while one sergeant claimed over £60,000. Police inspectors cannot claim overtime and their income starts at £45,624. Such bonus payments include double-time for working on bank holidays, but many in the private sector do this with no increase in their wages whatsoever. Why is the public sector so generous with our money?
 
Good news for the taxpayer comes from Bath with the sale of 85 per cent of BBC Audiobooks. BBC Worldwide set up the company in 2001, which employs 100 local people, and will retain a 15 per cent stake. Proceeds from the sale will be re-invested in BBC programme making, says a managing director of BBC Worldwide. Let’s hope it doesn’t go into topping up their ludicrously overpaid pension funds. Employees of the newly titled AudioGo company will not be entitled to BBC pensions.
 
Tim Newark, Bath TPA


The overtime gravy train for the police continues to chug along in Avon and Somerset. Last year, Avon and Somerset police went over budget by £2 million. Four of their PCs managed to earn more than theirBath TPA-small inspectors. A fully trained Police Constable is paid a starting salary of £25,317 but by claiming overtime, four PCs earned over £50,000 while one sergeant claimed over £60,000. Police inspectors cannot claim overtime and their income starts at £45,624. Such bonus payments include double-time for working on bank holidays, but many in the private sector do this with no increase in their wages whatsoever. Why is the public sector so generous with our money?
 
Good news for the taxpayer comes from Bath with the sale of 85 per cent of BBC Audiobooks. BBC Worldwide set up the company in 2001, which employs 100 local people, and will retain a 15 per cent stake. Proceeds from the sale will be re-invested in BBC programme making, says a managing director of BBC Worldwide. Let’s hope it doesn’t go into topping up their ludicrously overpaid pension funds. Employees of the newly titled AudioGo company will not be entitled to BBC pensions.
 
Tim Newark, Bath TPA


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