BBC Daily Politics discussion of Let them eat carbon

September 16, 2011 7:14 PM

This Wednesday, I appeared on the Daily Politics presenting a soapbox piece about rising energy prices, and how climate change policies are making the problem much worse.  That was followed up by a discussion in the studio with Grant Shapps MP and Tessa Jowell MP.  There is an expanded version of the argument I made in the soapbox as an article on their website which you can read here.

[iframe http://www.youtube.com/embed/KGPaqJ7AH6s 500 284]

There have also been two prominent blogs about the report.  First an article by respected commentator Jim Manzi for the National Review Online. He wrote that:

Taxes, fees, restrictions and other economic costs imposed in the name of ameliorating climate change are vastly larger in the U.K. than in America.  There is a stifling consensus between left and right on the subject among the British political class. There are a few freethinkers, however, who just won’t get with the program. Among the most persuasive of them is Matthew Sinclair, director of the Taxpayers Alliance. 


Then I've written a piece for the Spectator website about the book, arguing that:

After a Spectator debate on climate change in March, Fraser Nelson wrote about whether or not we should try to engage in the debate ourselves or “trust the expert”. Simon Singh had argued in the debate that the most credible experts supported the view that the human contribution to potential global warming was real and serious. The response to my new book Let Them Eat Carbon shows how much that kind of debate is turned on its head when it comes to policy.


The book is available in paperback and Kindle editions.

 This Wednesday, I appeared on the Daily Politics presenting a soapbox piece about rising energy prices, and how climate change policies are making the problem much worse.  That was followed up by a discussion in the studio with Grant Shapps MP and Tessa Jowell MP.  There is an expanded version of the argument I made in the soapbox as an article on their website which you can read here.

[iframe http://www.youtube.com/embed/KGPaqJ7AH6s 500 284]

There have also been two prominent blogs about the report.  First an article by respected commentator Jim Manzi for the National Review Online. He wrote that:

Taxes, fees, restrictions and other economic costs imposed in the name of ameliorating climate change are vastly larger in the U.K. than in America.  There is a stifling consensus between left and right on the subject among the British political class. There are a few freethinkers, however, who just won’t get with the program. Among the most persuasive of them is Matthew Sinclair, director of the Taxpayers Alliance. 


Then I've written a piece for the Spectator website about the book, arguing that:

After a Spectator debate on climate change in March, Fraser Nelson wrote about whether or not we should try to engage in the debate ourselves or “trust the expert”. Simon Singh had argued in the debate that the most credible experts supported the view that the human contribution to potential global warming was real and serious. The response to my new book Let Them Eat Carbon shows how much that kind of debate is turned on its head when it comes to policy.


The book is available in paperback and Kindle editions.

 

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