Councils in the North West wrong to hike Council Tax

February 28, 2012 4:23 PM

Continuing our nationwide campaign against planned Council Tax rises, we are highlighting research and official statistics to put the proposed increases in context and suggest some areas where savings could be made instead. Today we have focused on a number of councils in the North West who are hiking council tax.

Many households are struggling with the rising cost of living yet are finding out that their local council has put forward plans to increase Council Tax, ignoring the Government's offer of help to pay for a freeze.

Council Tax is second only to VAT as the most burdensome tax for the poorest households. Most local authorities have chosen to freeze rates while some, like the Chorley Borough Council or Wirral Council, have chosen to help local families by cutting rates. Those politicians proposing rises have instead decided to increase the burden on already hard-pressed families.

Preston City Council
Proposed rise: 3.5 per cent
Want to hike the rates despite residents seeing their Council Tax bills increase by 40 per cent since 2001

South Ribble Borough Council
Proposed rise: 2.5 per cent

Where residents have seen their Council Tax bills increase by 87  per cent since 2001

St Helens Borough Council
Proposed rise: 2.0 per cent

Where 9 executives receive more than a hundred thousand pounds in remuneration and the estimated cost of trade union officials  is £131,295

Barrow Borough Council
Proposed rise: 3.49 per cent

Where staff were paid 65p per mile for using their cars in 2010/11, far higher than the HMRC recommended rate of 40p per mile

Allerdale Borough Council
Proposed rise: 2.9 per cent

Where staff were paid 65p per mile for using their cars in 2010/11, far higher than the HMRC recommended rate of 40p per mile

The most up-to-date list of town halls hiking Council Tax can be found here


Continuing our nationwide campaign against planned Council Tax rises, we are highlighting research and official statistics to put the proposed increases in context and suggest some areas where savings could be made instead. Today we have focused on a number of councils in the North West who are hiking council tax.

Many households are struggling with the rising cost of living yet are finding out that their local council has put forward plans to increase Council Tax, ignoring the Government's offer of help to pay for a freeze.

Council Tax is second only to VAT as the most burdensome tax for the poorest households. Most local authorities have chosen to freeze rates while some, like the Chorley Borough Council or Wirral Council, have chosen to help local families by cutting rates. Those politicians proposing rises have instead decided to increase the burden on already hard-pressed families.

Preston City Council
Proposed rise: 3.5 per cent
Want to hike the rates despite residents seeing their Council Tax bills increase by 40 per cent since 2001

South Ribble Borough Council
Proposed rise: 2.5 per cent

Where residents have seen their Council Tax bills increase by 87  per cent since 2001

St Helens Borough Council
Proposed rise: 2.0 per cent

Where 9 executives receive more than a hundred thousand pounds in remuneration and the estimated cost of trade union officials  is £131,295

Barrow Borough Council
Proposed rise: 3.49 per cent

Where staff were paid 65p per mile for using their cars in 2010/11, far higher than the HMRC recommended rate of 40p per mile

Allerdale Borough Council
Proposed rise: 2.9 per cent

Where staff were paid 65p per mile for using their cars in 2010/11, far higher than the HMRC recommended rate of 40p per mile

The most up-to-date list of town halls hiking Council Tax can be found here


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