More VAT protests

April 27, 2012 12:15 PM

It was a day of protest in Westminster yesterday. Those opposing the co-called 'Pasty Tax' converged on Downing Street to let David Cameron and George Osborne know what they think of plans to introduce VAT on savouries served above ambient temperature. A petition with 306,773 signatures (including my name) organised by the bakery chain Greggs was also presented to the House of Commons by North Tyneside MP, Mary Glindon.

During an interview on the BBC, Chris Pocklington, of Pocklington's Bakery in Lincolnshire, described the anger felt by those in the industry. He said:
Where it's going to penalise our customers is where they come in and buy a family steak pie, they take it home and warn it up for their tea. A lot of people are looking at cheaper ways of eating; they're eating out less, and taking more food home and doing their own cooking. They come in and buy a pie that has probably just come out of the oven to take home and eat at night and they will have to pay 20% VAT on it.

Later in the day, the adjournment debate in the House of Commons was secured by Graham Stuart, the MP for Beverley and Holderness. The subject was the introduction of VAT on static caravans. Mr Stuart said he would give way to allow other MPs to have their say, and 21 MPs intervened and spoke in the short debate. All of them were united in their opposition to this tax grab. All of them were concerned on how adding 20% to the cost of a static caravan would impact on jobs in their constituencies. During the debate, Mr Stuart had this to say:
I ran a street surgery in Withernsea, a coastal town in my constituency, on Saturday. As I stood talking to people and handing out leaflets, perhaps as many as three out of 10 people said to me, “I’m not from round here, mate.” They were not staying in bed and breakfasts or hotels, because we have hardly any in the area; they were staying in static caravans. Two or three out of every 10 people going into Aldi, or into the bakery down the road, or spending money in the pubs were staying in static caravans. In addition to those directly employed in the manufacture of the caravans and in addition to the parks, however important they all are, the importance of visitors to the rural economy is immense. That is why there has been such a groundswell of feeling that this issue should be reconsidered.

Click here to read the full debate


There is a growing groundswell of opinion against taxing taxing static caravans and freshly baked pastries, just as there is against the Chancellor's decision to raise fuel duty by 3p a litre in August. We are campaigning against that in Grantham tomorrow.  If you can join us, please let me know.

Taxing static caravans will cost jobs. Taxing pies, pasties and sausage rolls will cost jobs. Raising fuel duty will also cost jobs. George Osborne must think again on these issues, and give ordinary taxpayers, many of whom are already struggling to pay their bills, a break.

 It was a day of protest in Westminster yesterday. Those opposing the co-called 'Pasty Tax' converged on Downing Street to let David Cameron and George Osborne know what they think of plans to introduce VAT on savouries served above ambient temperature. A petition with 306,773 signatures (including my name) organised by the bakery chain Greggs was also presented to the House of Commons by North Tyneside MP, Mary Glindon.

During an interview on the BBC, Chris Pocklington, of Pocklington's Bakery in Lincolnshire, described the anger felt by those in the industry. He said:
Where it's going to penalise our customers is where they come in and buy a family steak pie, they take it home and warn it up for their tea. A lot of people are looking at cheaper ways of eating; they're eating out less, and taking more food home and doing their own cooking. They come in and buy a pie that has probably just come out of the oven to take home and eat at night and they will have to pay 20% VAT on it.

Later in the day, the adjournment debate in the House of Commons was secured by Graham Stuart, the MP for Beverley and Holderness. The subject was the introduction of VAT on static caravans. Mr Stuart said he would give way to allow other MPs to have their say, and 21 MPs intervened and spoke in the short debate. All of them were united in their opposition to this tax grab. All of them were concerned on how adding 20% to the cost of a static caravan would impact on jobs in their constituencies. During the debate, Mr Stuart had this to say:
I ran a street surgery in Withernsea, a coastal town in my constituency, on Saturday. As I stood talking to people and handing out leaflets, perhaps as many as three out of 10 people said to me, “I’m not from round here, mate.” They were not staying in bed and breakfasts or hotels, because we have hardly any in the area; they were staying in static caravans. Two or three out of every 10 people going into Aldi, or into the bakery down the road, or spending money in the pubs were staying in static caravans. In addition to those directly employed in the manufacture of the caravans and in addition to the parks, however important they all are, the importance of visitors to the rural economy is immense. That is why there has been such a groundswell of feeling that this issue should be reconsidered.

Click here to read the full debate


There is a growing groundswell of opinion against taxing taxing static caravans and freshly baked pastries, just as there is against the Chancellor's decision to raise fuel duty by 3p a litre in August. We are campaigning against that in Grantham tomorrow.  If you can join us, please let me know.

Taxing static caravans will cost jobs. Taxing pies, pasties and sausage rolls will cost jobs. Raising fuel duty will also cost jobs. George Osborne must think again on these issues, and give ordinary taxpayers, many of whom are already struggling to pay their bills, a break.

 

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