New articles about Let them eat carbon on ConservativeHome and Public Service Europe

August 18, 2011 6:05 PM

I've written two new articles based on the book for the websites ConservativeHome and Public Service Europe looking at the politics of climate change and the effectiveness of a key regulation, the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme.



In the article for ConservativeHome, I look at the political price that the Conservatives, indeed all the three major parties, are paying for embracing radical climate change policies and argue that "it means missing out on the opportunity to be the party of lower energy prices and get the kind of electoral advantage conservatives in Australia, Canada and the United States have enjoyed" and will make "the fiscal adjustment feel a lot less like a gentle squeeze and a lot more like painful austerity."

For Public Service Europe I've looked at the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, a major regulation whose cost we released a press release about earlier this week.  I summarise the failure of the scheme in the introduction to the article, describing it as "like a cargo ship stranded on a beach. Expected to play its vital part in an international carbon economy, it is grounded on the hard economic realities facing Europe. It sits there looking lonely and pointless thanks to the failure to secure an international deal. Instead of lucky locals picking over crates of consumer goods, there are big businesses and financiers making handsome profits at the expense of poor consumers. Instead of an insurer picking up the bill, families get higher electricity prices. Too many manufacturing workers play the role of the crew, and will be looking for a new job."

There is lots more on both these issues in the book.I've written two new articles based on the book for the websites ConservativeHome and Public Service Europe looking at the politics of climate change and the effectiveness of a key regulation, the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme.



In the article for ConservativeHome, I look at the political price that the Conservatives, indeed all the three major parties, are paying for embracing radical climate change policies and argue that "it means missing out on the opportunity to be the party of lower energy prices and get the kind of electoral advantage conservatives in Australia, Canada and the United States have enjoyed" and will make "the fiscal adjustment feel a lot less like a gentle squeeze and a lot more like painful austerity."

For Public Service Europe I've looked at the EU Emissions Trading Scheme, a major regulation whose cost we released a press release about earlier this week.  I summarise the failure of the scheme in the introduction to the article, describing it as "like a cargo ship stranded on a beach. Expected to play its vital part in an international carbon economy, it is grounded on the hard economic realities facing Europe. It sits there looking lonely and pointless thanks to the failure to secure an international deal. Instead of lucky locals picking over crates of consumer goods, there are big businesses and financiers making handsome profits at the expense of poor consumers. Instead of an insurer picking up the bill, families get higher electricity prices. Too many manufacturing workers play the role of the crew, and will be looking for a new job."

There is lots more on both these issues in the book.

Latest Blogs:

TaxPayers' Alliance Icon

We're hiring a Campaign Manager - Digital

11:37 AM 16, Jan 2017 The TaxPayers' Alliance

TaxPayers' Alliance Icon

Increases in precepts are not the answer

3:30 PM 13, Jan 2017 James Price

TaxPayers' Alliance Icon

We must all stand up for a free press

10:39 AM 06, Jan 2017 Dia Chakravarty

TaxPayers' Alliance Icon

Want to be our new Policy Analyst?

12:52 PM 05, Jan 2017 The TaxPayers' Alliance

TaxPayers' Alliance Icon

Are rail fares too high?

3:38 PM 03, Jan 2017 Alex Wild