New figures show why it is time to drop the regressive Sugar Tax

September 09, 2016 10:53 AM

Responding to new data published today in the National Diet and Nutrition Survey (NDNS), the TaxPayers' Alliance is calling on the new government to scrap George Osborne's sugar tax.

Data from the NDNS adds to the weight of evidence that shows consumption of sugar from soft drinks is falling. As such there is no reason for a punitive sugar tax.

Today's data shows us that:

  • In all but one demographic group, soft drinks are now a smaller contributor to sugar intake than in 2008

  • All children aged 11-18 reduced their consumption of sugar from soft drinks by 3.2 percentage points

This new data, showing that we are consuming less sugar from soft drinks, is supported by much of the previous research. The annual Family Food Survey conducted by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs shows that sugar consumption from soft drinks has fallen by a third in just over a decade.



International evidence suggests that a sugar tax reduces consumption of calories from soft drinks by fewer than 5 calories per person per day

It is badly designed, poorly thought through measure that will only serve to hit the poorest hardest - the sugar tax should be scrapped.

John O’Connell, Chief Executive of the TaxPayers' Alliance said:

"This new data confirms what the evidence has been showing for some time - that there is simply no need for a badly thought through sugar tax that will have no discernible impact on people's diet or lifestyle choices. Lasting change will happen via a long-term cultural shift, not by burdening the poorest families with a higher cost of living. This is yet another example of irresponsible meddling from the High Priests of the Nanny State, introducing entirely unnecessary complications into an impenetrable tax system and pushing up the cost of everyday products for hard-pressed families."

TPA spokesmen are available for live and pre-recorded broadcast interviews via 07795 084 113 (no texts)

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