Non-job of the week

September 15, 2010 6:02 PM

Local councils are certainly feeling the pinch and there’s no doubt that this is being reflected in their recruitment, but although non-jobs are definitely thin on the ground this week, unfortunately they aren’t entirely extinct...


On the jobsgopublic.com website, Charnwood Borough Council are advertising for a Physical ActivityNj16 Development Officer (£19,521 – £21,519) to take part in their ‘Active Together Programme’ which encourages adults to participate in “at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity sport and active recreation (including walking) on three or more days each week”, and Tonbridge Wells Borough Council would like a Greener Borough Officer (£23,188 plus  – ironically – £963 essential car user’s allowance) to “implement carbon reduction strategies across the borough” alongside the usual stuff about encouraging recycling, “behavioural change” and supporting energy awareness. Are these really our priorities as frontline services come under threat?


This week’s non-job comes from Burnley Borough Council which apparently is a place that has an “increasing ambition”, unfortunately they’ll also have a decreasing budget. Which begs the question – can they afford this?:


Cultural Regeneration Officer
£18,966 – £21,020 (29 hours a week)


A town surrounded by outstanding countryside and overlooked by Pendle Hill, famous for her witch trials; a town where remnants of an illustrious industrial age, from canals to former cotton mills, are juxtaposed against educational improvements on a scale greater than anywhere else in the country; a town where advanced manufacturing grows and a workforce is being developed to suit.


Burnley is a place that has increasing ambition, and this is reciprocated in the developments that are happening around the town. Wanting to lead the way in creative regeneration that has community ownership, building on past good practice and making the most of opportunities that arise in the future the appointment of this post will play a key role in helping us achieve our aim.


The post of Cultural Regeneration officer (funded by Arts Council England, Lancashire County Council and Burnley Council) will oversee the development of art in public spaces in Burnley, working directly with council departments and strategically with neighbouring authorities. The post will advocate the role artists and creative practitioners play in good quality design and place making and implement relevant processes to ensure this is adopted in future developments. Burnley’s town centre public realm strategies recognise creativity as an aspect of good practice and the Cultural Regeneration officer will be charged with fund raising and leading on commissions for Burnley’s public realm, as well as being a key advisor to the council on relevant development negotiations as and when they occur.


The appointment of a Cultural Regeneration Officer represents Burnley’s support for encouraging creative dialogue between all parties involved, ensuring high quality delivery that also provides opportunities for learning and development of others. Recently awarded funding towards a flagship public art project within the Education and Enterprise development area of the town, with artists already shortlisted the this a great opportunity for the Cultural Regeneration officer to make an impact instantly”.

Local councils are certainly feeling the pinch and there’s no doubt that this is being reflected in their recruitment, but although non-jobs are definitely thin on the ground this week, unfortunately they aren’t entirely extinct...


On the jobsgopublic.com website, Charnwood Borough Council are advertising for a Physical ActivityNj16 Development Officer (£19,521 – £21,519) to take part in their ‘Active Together Programme’ which encourages adults to participate in “at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity sport and active recreation (including walking) on three or more days each week”, and Tonbridge Wells Borough Council would like a Greener Borough Officer (£23,188 plus  – ironically – £963 essential car user’s allowance) to “implement carbon reduction strategies across the borough” alongside the usual stuff about encouraging recycling, “behavioural change” and supporting energy awareness. Are these really our priorities as frontline services come under threat?


This week’s non-job comes from Burnley Borough Council which apparently is a place that has an “increasing ambition”, unfortunately they’ll also have a decreasing budget. Which begs the question – can they afford this?:


Cultural Regeneration Officer
£18,966 – £21,020 (29 hours a week)


A town surrounded by outstanding countryside and overlooked by Pendle Hill, famous for her witch trials; a town where remnants of an illustrious industrial age, from canals to former cotton mills, are juxtaposed against educational improvements on a scale greater than anywhere else in the country; a town where advanced manufacturing grows and a workforce is being developed to suit.


Burnley is a place that has increasing ambition, and this is reciprocated in the developments that are happening around the town. Wanting to lead the way in creative regeneration that has community ownership, building on past good practice and making the most of opportunities that arise in the future the appointment of this post will play a key role in helping us achieve our aim.


The post of Cultural Regeneration officer (funded by Arts Council England, Lancashire County Council and Burnley Council) will oversee the development of art in public spaces in Burnley, working directly with council departments and strategically with neighbouring authorities. The post will advocate the role artists and creative practitioners play in good quality design and place making and implement relevant processes to ensure this is adopted in future developments. Burnley’s town centre public realm strategies recognise creativity as an aspect of good practice and the Cultural Regeneration officer will be charged with fund raising and leading on commissions for Burnley’s public realm, as well as being a key advisor to the council on relevant development negotiations as and when they occur.


The appointment of a Cultural Regeneration Officer represents Burnley’s support for encouraging creative dialogue between all parties involved, ensuring high quality delivery that also provides opportunities for learning and development of others. Recently awarded funding towards a flagship public art project within the Education and Enterprise development area of the town, with artists already shortlisted the this a great opportunity for the Cultural Regeneration officer to make an impact instantly”.

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