Non-job of the week

May 16, 2012 4:57 PM

Last week I wrote about a major management reorganisation at Hull City Council. The council leader, Cllr Steve Brady, said he was looking to make at least £1 million in savings. He also added that the council has 'a top-heavy structure' which needs to be addressed.

This is good to hear (although we don't know the full details yet), and on face value, Telford and Wrekin Council were trying to do something similar. Last year the council made the post of Chief Executive redundant, saving taxpayers a salary of £149,000. For a while, the Chief Executive was also in charge of Children's Services.

All is not what it seems though. The council then employed its first Managing Director on a salary of £137,000, and in addition to that appointment, it has also created the new post of Head of Children's and Family Services, paying £109,000 a year, plus benefits.  

No-one doubts the importance of child protection, but if the former Chief Executive managed to do the job, why can't the new Managing Director? When the council is looking to save money, why is it creating new senior management jobs?

It is not just me asking these questions.  Here is part of an editorial written by the Shropshire Star newspaper discussing the newly created post:
The twists and turns leading to the new post are interesting. For a while, in a move to cut costs, the council chief executive Victor Brownlees doubled up on roles and became the borough’s children’s champion. The roof did not fall in.

The newspaper also comments on high senior pay in town halls:
Councils love to justify high salaries by making some sort of comparison with the private sector. That works both ways.

Currently, outside the council bubble economy, the private sector is feeling the full force of the harsh winds of austerity. Pay is being frozen, jobs are being lost, and cutbacks are being made.

It is hard to believe that in the current climate a six-figure sum is necessary to attract somebody motivated to help children and young people. It would be illuminating to see how the figure is arrived at, apart from it being some sort of going rate agreed by councils.

Hull City Council is going to cut the number of senior managers, and I am sure the roof will not fall in. Telford and Wrekin Council have had the opportunity to do the same, but have failed to grasp the nettle. Creating new six-figure salaried jobs cannot be justified.Last week I wrote about a major management reorganisation at Hull City Council. The council leader, Cllr Steve Brady, said he was looking to make at least £1 million in savings. He also added that the council has 'a top-heavy structure' which needs to be addressed.

This is good to hear (although we don't know the full details yet), and on face value, Telford and Wrekin Council were trying to do something similar. Last year the council made the post of Chief Executive redundant, saving taxpayers a salary of £149,000. For a while, the Chief Executive was also in charge of Children's Services.

All is not what it seems though. The council then employed its first Managing Director on a salary of £137,000, and in addition to that appointment, it has also created the new post of Head of Children's and Family Services, paying £109,000 a year, plus benefits.  

No-one doubts the importance of child protection, but if the former Chief Executive managed to do the job, why can't the new Managing Director? When the council is looking to save money, why is it creating new senior management jobs?

It is not just me asking these questions.  Here is part of an editorial written by the Shropshire Star newspaper discussing the newly created post:
The twists and turns leading to the new post are interesting. For a while, in a move to cut costs, the council chief executive Victor Brownlees doubled up on roles and became the borough’s children’s champion. The roof did not fall in.

The newspaper also comments on high senior pay in town halls:
Councils love to justify high salaries by making some sort of comparison with the private sector. That works both ways.

Currently, outside the council bubble economy, the private sector is feeling the full force of the harsh winds of austerity. Pay is being frozen, jobs are being lost, and cutbacks are being made.

It is hard to believe that in the current climate a six-figure sum is necessary to attract somebody motivated to help children and young people. It would be illuminating to see how the figure is arrived at, apart from it being some sort of going rate agreed by councils.

Hull City Council is going to cut the number of senior managers, and I am sure the roof will not fall in. Telford and Wrekin Council have had the opportunity to do the same, but have failed to grasp the nettle. Creating new six-figure salaried jobs cannot be justified.

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