Whitehall bonus culture must end

February 16, 2012 4:34 PM

It was revealed this week that Whitehall bureaucrats received over £22.8 million in bonuses in the last year. In a further indication that the public sector pay freeze is not being taken seriously enough, the Civil Service continues to pay out huge ‘performance-related’ extras to its staff. While hard-pressed taxpayers struggle under burdensome taxation, it is unacceptable that Whitehall departments are padding their staff’s bank accounts with taxpayers’ money.

Bonuses are supposed to reward exceptional staff who excel in their jobs and who make an outstanding contribution to their organisation. In the Civil Service, where managers have nothing so boring as productivity to worry about, bonuses are calculated using a complicated formula including the staff member’s contribution to hitting diversity quotas. Aside from the sheer cost of these pay-outs, serious questions must be asked about what makes these bureaucrats’ performance so exceptional. It seems that already highly-paid civil servants are being applauded as if the minimum wasn’t mandatory.

Looking at the figures more closely, four departments have actually increased the amount paid out in bonuses. One is the Department of Energy and Climate Change, which has increased its bonus pot by 12 per cent since 2010 to £1.1million. This rise comes despite that department’s relentless drive to waste taxpayers’ money. The TaxPayers’ Alliance has revealed that their green initiatives will greatly increase the amount that households pay in energy bills in the next several years.

The Department for International Development doled out £1.3million to its top employees last year, again despite their careless use of taxpayers’ money. It is well-documented that their aid programmes are wasteful and susceptible to fraud, but they are still rewarded for their “excellent” performance.

Jeremy Beeton, director general of the Government Olympic Executive, received the most in Whitehall, with £187,500 in bonuses alone. This was on top of his salary of £220,000. His bonus is hard to justify when the Government Olympic Executive has failed to halt the huge increases in the Olympics’ budget, which has risen from the original £2.37billion to £9.3billion.

It is inexcusable for such an exorbitant amount of hard-earned taxpayers’ money to be given to so many civil servants just for doing their jobs. If bonuses are to be given, they should be for truly outstanding performance, as they are in the private sector. The public sector needs to stop focusing on hitting misguided diversity quotas and start paying attention to cutting waste and saving taxpayers’ money.



 


It was revealed this week that Whitehall bureaucrats received over £22.8 million in bonuses in the last year. In a further indication that the public sector pay freeze is not being taken seriously enough, the Civil Service continues to pay out huge ‘performance-related’ extras to its staff. While hard-pressed taxpayers struggle under burdensome taxation, it is unacceptable that Whitehall departments are padding their staff’s bank accounts with taxpayers’ money.

Bonuses are supposed to reward exceptional staff who excel in their jobs and who make an outstanding contribution to their organisation. In the Civil Service, where managers have nothing so boring as productivity to worry about, bonuses are calculated using a complicated formula including the staff member’s contribution to hitting diversity quotas. Aside from the sheer cost of these pay-outs, serious questions must be asked about what makes these bureaucrats’ performance so exceptional. It seems that already highly-paid civil servants are being applauded as if the minimum wasn’t mandatory.

Looking at the figures more closely, four departments have actually increased the amount paid out in bonuses. One is the Department of Energy and Climate Change, which has increased its bonus pot by 12 per cent since 2010 to £1.1million. This rise comes despite that department’s relentless drive to waste taxpayers’ money. The TaxPayers’ Alliance has revealed that their green initiatives will greatly increase the amount that households pay in energy bills in the next several years.

The Department for International Development doled out £1.3million to its top employees last year, again despite their careless use of taxpayers’ money. It is well-documented that their aid programmes are wasteful and susceptible to fraud, but they are still rewarded for their “excellent” performance.

Jeremy Beeton, director general of the Government Olympic Executive, received the most in Whitehall, with £187,500 in bonuses alone. This was on top of his salary of £220,000. His bonus is hard to justify when the Government Olympic Executive has failed to halt the huge increases in the Olympics’ budget, which has risen from the original £2.37billion to £9.3billion.

It is inexcusable for such an exorbitant amount of hard-earned taxpayers’ money to be given to so many civil servants just for doing their jobs. If bonuses are to be given, they should be for truly outstanding performance, as they are in the private sector. The public sector needs to stop focusing on hitting misguided diversity quotas and start paying attention to cutting waste and saving taxpayers’ money.



 


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