Cornish health waste

March 21, 2011 11:00 AM

The Chief Executive of the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust (RCHT) has warned its 5,000 staff that they need to make savings this year of £26 million. That means losing 200 jobs and cutting the budget by 15% in back-room departments and a further 10% in front-line services. Unions are up in arms because they fear that many of their members are being downgraded as they are told to reapply for less senior jobs. Said one radiographer: "We suspect people will be downgraded to Band 6 but still doing the Band 7 role, on less money."

But not everyone seems to be onside with the savings message. A Cornish TPA supporter passes on the discontent of a Truro nurse. Despite the impending cuts, the RCHT hospital at Truro is investing in a computer programme designed to allow nurses and other front line staff to upload their thoughts and written reports on a screen above their desk ‘to flash the news for all to see’.

"Another unnecessary job to add to the workers’ day. What fun the desk-bound management section have," noted our informant. "I am not sure how this new project works, but to cut staff and install expensive equipment that create work seems to be unproductive, unnecessary, or silly."

If it is anything like Truro’s 49-page ‘Policy and Procedure for Being Open’, highlighting the need for interpersonal skills in a hospital, or the 10-day management jolly disguised as ‘New Horizon Thinking’ to promote leadership skills among middle and senior hospital managers, it really should be the first in line for the chop.

It is certainly fascinating to note the cost of computer equipment and services last month at the RCHT—a total of £201,867.41 in just one month. Just when the Chief Executive is asking for cuts in staff and wages.

Tim Newark, Bath & South-West TaxPayers’ AllianceThe Chief Executive of the Royal Cornwall Hospitals Trust (RCHT) has warned its 5,000 staff that they need to make savings this year of £26 million. That means losing 200 jobs and cutting the budget by 15% in back-room departments and a further 10% in front-line services. Unions are up in arms because they fear that many of their members are being downgraded as they are told to reapply for less senior jobs. Said one radiographer: "We suspect people will be downgraded to Band 6 but still doing the Band 7 role, on less money."

But not everyone seems to be onside with the savings message. A Cornish TPA supporter passes on the discontent of a Truro nurse. Despite the impending cuts, the RCHT hospital at Truro is investing in a computer programme designed to allow nurses and other front line staff to upload their thoughts and written reports on a screen above their desk ‘to flash the news for all to see’.

"Another unnecessary job to add to the workers’ day. What fun the desk-bound management section have," noted our informant. "I am not sure how this new project works, but to cut staff and install expensive equipment that create work seems to be unproductive, unnecessary, or silly."

If it is anything like Truro’s 49-page ‘Policy and Procedure for Being Open’, highlighting the need for interpersonal skills in a hospital, or the 10-day management jolly disguised as ‘New Horizon Thinking’ to promote leadership skills among middle and senior hospital managers, it really should be the first in line for the chop.

It is certainly fascinating to note the cost of computer equipment and services last month at the RCHT—a total of £201,867.41 in just one month. Just when the Chief Executive is asking for cuts in staff and wages.

Tim Newark, Bath & South-West TaxPayers’ Alliance

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