It’s not because they love Guinness

September 27, 2011 1:25 PM

Micro-blogging website Twitter is to set up a new HQ in Dublin and I’m willing to bet that it’s not because they love Guinness.

Ireland’s attractive 12.5 per cent corporate tax rate is bound to have been a big sweetener for the firm, which has been valued at upwards of £5 billion.

The news is a blow to the Treasury, who were hoping that a London office opened earlier this year would become Twitter’s European HQ. But catchy names, like Tech City and Silicon Roundabout, and even the irresistible allure of Boris Johnson are not going to be enough to convince the micro-blogging website to bring its money over here when our main rate of corporation tax is 26 per cent.



The list of internet firms who are now benefitting from Ireland’s lower corporation tax reads like the bookmarks menu on most people’s internet browsers: Google, Facebook, Amazon, Yahoo, eBay and Microsoft all have offices there, to name but a few. The presence of businesses like these means more jobs in Dublin. Google alone is one of Dublin’s biggest employers, with 2,200 staff.

With modern technology allowing them to work from almost anywhere in the world, companies like Twitter are not going to choose the UK without a more competitive corporate tax rate as an incentive. Read our briefing on corporation tax from Tax Commissioner Anthony J. Evans for more.Micro-blogging website Twitter is to set up a new HQ in Dublin and I’m willing to bet that it’s not because they love Guinness.

Ireland’s attractive 12.5 per cent corporate tax rate is bound to have been a big sweetener for the firm, which has been valued at upwards of £5 billion.

The news is a blow to the Treasury, who were hoping that a London office opened earlier this year would become Twitter’s European HQ. But catchy names, like Tech City and Silicon Roundabout, and even the irresistible allure of Boris Johnson are not going to be enough to convince the micro-blogging website to bring its money over here when our main rate of corporation tax is 26 per cent.



The list of internet firms who are now benefitting from Ireland’s lower corporation tax reads like the bookmarks menu on most people’s internet browsers: Google, Facebook, Amazon, Yahoo, eBay and Microsoft all have offices there, to name but a few. The presence of businesses like these means more jobs in Dublin. Google alone is one of Dublin’s biggest employers, with 2,200 staff.

With modern technology allowing them to work from almost anywhere in the world, companies like Twitter are not going to choose the UK without a more competitive corporate tax rate as an incentive. Read our briefing on corporation tax from Tax Commissioner Anthony J. Evans for more.

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