Non-job of the week

October 05, 2011 2:30 PM

Former cabinet minister, John Redwood, said on his blog that he nearly choked on his coffee when he looked at the appointments section of a leading newspaper. Some of the public sector jobs on offer even surprised him. We may have been promised a bonfire of the quangos, but the vast majority are still there, and offering very generous remuneration packages. Mr Redwood highlighted a few, however this one really caught my attention.

The Marine Management Office (MMO) is looking for a new chief executive, paying £110K a year plus a bonus of up to 10%. The job advert says this is a pivotal, high profile role. This is so pivotal, and so high profile that I couldn't tell you who the last chief executive was!

Non-Job of the WeekThe fishing quotas we have are set by the EU, yet the MMO states it 'enables sustainable development in English waters'. It's job is to 'plan, regulate and license activity in the marine area.' So we have an army of bureaucrats in Brussels regulating the fishing industry, and another quango here too doing what must be some duplication of work. It's amazing that as soon as you appoint a chief executive of a quango, no matter how small or large it is, a six-figure salary automatically comes as part of the prize.

The Tenants Services Authority (TSA) is the regulator for social housing. At the beginning of last year, it was revealed in the News of the World that in the last year the TSA had received 396 complaints from members of the public about their landlords. It passed 384 to other authorities, and dealt with 12 themselves. Hardly run of their feet, were they? Despite this lack of work, the chief executive still managed to pick-up a total remuneration package of £196,906 in 2009/10. The most recent accounts reveals the amount of cases it received certainly rose. There were 1203, but when you take a look at how much work was passed on to other agencies (look at the bottom of page 12), you can see that life in the TSA is not a helter-skelter existence.

Despite this, although the chief executive's salary has reduced, his total remuneration was still £171,157.

Let me make it clear, if tenants do have a legitimate complaint against their landlord, they have a right to get the complaint investigated. But does it really need a quango to do it? Does it really need a chief executive on a more than generous salary, plus bonus, plus a gold plated pension?

There is still much fat to trim.

 
Former cabinet minister, John Redwood, said on his blog that he nearly choked on his coffee when he looked at the appointments section of a leading newspaper. Some of the public sector jobs on offer even surprised him. We may have been promised a bonfire of the quangos, but the vast majority are still there, and offering very generous remuneration packages. Mr Redwood highlighted a few, however this one really caught my attention.

The Marine Management Office (MMO) is looking for a new chief executive, paying £110K a year plus a bonus of up to 10%. The job advert says this is a pivotal, high profile role. This is so pivotal, and so high profile that I couldn't tell you who the last chief executive was!

Non-Job of the WeekThe fishing quotas we have are set by the EU, yet the MMO states it 'enables sustainable development in English waters'. It's job is to 'plan, regulate and license activity in the marine area.' So we have an army of bureaucrats in Brussels regulating the fishing industry, and another quango here too doing what must be some duplication of work. It's amazing that as soon as you appoint a chief executive of a quango, no matter how small or large it is, a six-figure salary automatically comes as part of the prize.

The Tenants Services Authority (TSA) is the regulator for social housing. At the beginning of last year, it was revealed in the News of the World that in the last year the TSA had received 396 complaints from members of the public about their landlords. It passed 384 to other authorities, and dealt with 12 themselves. Hardly run of their feet, were they? Despite this lack of work, the chief executive still managed to pick-up a total remuneration package of £196,906 in 2009/10. The most recent accounts reveals the amount of cases it received certainly rose. There were 1203, but when you take a look at how much work was passed on to other agencies (look at the bottom of page 12), you can see that life in the TSA is not a helter-skelter existence.

Despite this, although the chief executive's salary has reduced, his total remuneration was still £171,157.

Let me make it clear, if tenants do have a legitimate complaint against their landlord, they have a right to get the complaint investigated. But does it really need a quango to do it? Does it really need a chief executive on a more than generous salary, plus bonus, plus a gold plated pension?

There is still much fat to trim.

 

                      
          

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